The Chilean Miners and Their Hidden Message

 MISSION ACCOMPLISHED!!!

Operation San Lorenzo (the patron saint of the miners) will go down in history as one of the world’s greatest stories of inspiration, resilience and the power of the human spirit. 

Here is the rescue of the second miner, Mario Sepulveda. Watch as he leads the crowd to a VIVA CHILE chant; one of the many emotional events from yesterday’s rescue. If you pay attention to Mario, you can hear him start getting the crowd pumped up by saying:  “Atencion Chile Mierda de Corazon…”

 Here is the rescue of Esteban Rojas. This one had me on tears. Seeing Esteban’s wife hold on to an image of La Virgen de Guadalupe and seeing him kneel down and pray was speechless.

Here are the top five touching moments according to Liz Goodwin from Yahoo. Enjoy.

Here is a song by Victor Jara in memory of the chilean miners. Victor Jara gives an introductory speech before singing this great song. Enjoy.

As I reflect on this amazing story, I think about the message that they planted for us to meditate and reflect on. Here we have 33 miners trapped over 2,000 feet below the ground coming together and demonstrating to the world, the beauty that comes along when one has faith, perservance, solidarity and more importantly love for one another. Each one of the miners had a different task to help the group. You had the paramedic, the spiritual counselor, the one who kept a diary of the group, etc. They pulled for each other like a family would do. They overcame adversity like no one would. They showed the world that if we use their example of operating in times of struggle, we can overcome any task at hand. They provided a blue print for how we should start living our lives.

There is a hidden message in this story and to find that hidden message we have to look deep within ourselves and reflect on our values and we have to reflect on the number 33. I think 33 in this context is the number that symbolizes Humanity. Interesting that the 33 miners were all rescued on 10-13-10 (add them up and you get 33). They were trapped for 69 days. And 69 is a symbol of attachment, where links are created. If we get spiritual, 33 is a very important number. There are 33 major religions. Jesus died at the age of 33. In the Gospels, it is written that Jesus accomplished 33 miracles. In Uruguay, people are devoted too La Virgen de los Treinta y Tres (Virgin of the 33). In many religions, 33 holds a significant meaning. Here is a link to find out about the mystery facts for the number 33.

I think one can also interpret this story from a different perspective. Imagine if the cave that they were trapped symbolizes darkness or interpreted as our world going through a dark period. In order for us to see the “light”, we have to start changing the way we treat others, especially the poorest of the poor. We have to change our egotistical, individualistic mentality. We have to shift from a capitalistic culture to a culture that values people more over profit. There is too much apathy in our world. Too much greed. The richest countries in the world continue to ignore the social issues affecting their given countries and the rest of the world. We don’t see the United States pledging trillions of dollars to eradicate poverty in the world. Instead that same amount of money has been spent on invading and occupying countries, killing innocent people and destroying humanity. Is that the way that we should live our lives? Going to war to protect “our national interest” when in reality all we are doing is stripping other countries resources for the benefit of some corporations and a few filthy capitalist.

Let us use the story of the miners as an inspiration. Let it be a way to rally people and nations of the world to come together and put the interest of mother earth and humanity at the forefront of our struggle to live in a peaceful world. We can no longer wait to let mother earth and humanity be destroyed by countries who only seek to profit from such catastrophes. Yesterday were the miners, tomorrow we may not be lucky to rescue our world. Let this be the initial phase of a whole new way of thinking. EACH ONE, TEACH ONE.

Here is a song by one of the most famous chilean bands, Los Jaivas, singing one of my favorite songs, Todos Juntos. One of my favorite quotes from the song is, “para que es el sol que nos alumbra si no nos podemos ni mirar.” Enjoy.

CHI..CHI..CHI…LE..LE..LE..
VIVA LOS MINEROS
DE CHILE!!!

5 Responses to “The Chilean Miners and Their Hidden Message”

  1. Frankorello Says:

    Every now and then come events that do bring the world together. The first moon landing did: I’m also old enough to remember back in 1988 when for a whole week the news was about a joint U.S.-Soviet operation to save a trapped whale. I think there is a great symbolism about coming out of the darkness, out of the feeling of hopelessness that we are trapped and there’s no way out…..Like most people, I often have dreams at night in which I get lost or confused and can’t find my way back where i need to. About a week before the miners got released I had a dream where I actually DID find my way back (from a ship after mistakenly enrolling in the Navy—it’s a long story, you know how dreams are.) I awoke with a tremendous sense of relief. …Maybe the long-anticipated apocalyptic ruin of the world is a premature conclusion, God giving us a second chance just as he spared Nineveh in the story of Jonah….We are the miners trapped down there, but we are also the rescuers, and we are also the TV viewers around the world, hoping and praying for each other. I think you are right. What we have witnessed is a story in the form of real events, a story about how to live.

  2. Vanessa Says:

    To be honest, I have not even had time to reflect on this story, but I am glad to take this time out right now. I am glad I came home the other day to join my grandparents in watching the first miner being rescued. I had chills as he was asceding and then reuniting with his son. I can’t even fathom what it must have been like for them to be so far underground. How did they survive? is the "Wow" question I ask myself. In times of desperation, humans act aggressively with savage like behavior. Especially when needs such as food and water are not being met, not to mention being in the dark. A saber como hicieron ellos para mantenerse estable en todo el sentido. From a psychological point of view, I think about their emotional and mental well being. Will they have trauma? what kind of trauma? Will they have trouble transitioning back to the "real world" especially with media bombarding their lives? What level of madness did they experience while they were in the mine? This is truly an amazing story. I am happy for the Chilean people and for the lessons that I hope we can all learn from this. I hope the mining companies and other companies can learn about how to improve their standards as well. Capitalism doesn’t care about the standards and look who ends up getting hurt. Thank you Gerardo for your wisdom and reflection. 33 is an interesting #

  3. Alfredo Says:

    How do you keep the faith when the world around you grows dim? How do you hold onto the lessons after the trauma has passed? The Chilean miners were on the periphery of my thoughts, a story I knew was desperate, but in a world of so much information and entertainment, tragedy- personal and so far removed, it is difficult to keep all of the threads straight. I know that if we pay attention to the world, whether it is the Chilean miners or the family members under our own roof, there is always a lesson to be learned about love. How do we connect our thoughts and actions to a compassionate heart. In this day of simultaneous experience, where we are more connected and less at once, I think it is easy to let miracles pass us by. It’s easy to read about the BP oil spill, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, any number of flash points which call our attention from immigration to education reform, and to get lost in the cataloging of the problems instead of illuminating the insights. Thanks for encouraging me to accept the dark spaces in my own life so we can move together towards the light.Un abrazo hermano…

  4. Alfredo Mathew Says:

    How do you keep the faith when the world around you grows dim? How do you hold onto the lessons after the trauma has passed? The Chilean miners were on the periphery of my thoughts, a story I knew was desperate, but in a world of so much information and entertainment, tragedy- personal and so far removed, it is difficult to keep all of the threads straight. I know that if we pay attention to the world, whether it is the Chilean miners or the family members under our own roof, there is always a lesson to be learned about love. How do we connect our thoughts and actions to a compassionate heart. In this day of simultaneous experience, where we are more connected and less at once, I think it is easy to let miracles pass us by. It’s easy to read about the BP oil spill, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, any number of flash points which call our attention from immigration to education reform, and to get lost in the cataloging of the problems instead of illuminating the insights. Thanks for encouraging me to accept the dark spaces in my own life so we can move together towards the light.Un abrazo hermano…

  5. Anonymous Says:

    I appreciate the thoughts being circulated. I also think about the psychological trauma that they experienced. I’m guessing that some might develop PTSD and the transitioning to the "real world" will be a very tough one. I hope the media will respect there privacy and not bombard them with these ridiculous offers. The corporations of these mines should definately be held accountable. I read somewhere that the miners were working in very inhumane conditions at the mina de San Jose."How do we connect our thoughts and actions to a compassionate heart." Alfredo, I think that is the question worth exploring. You are right about there will always be lessons of Love that we need to learn from. I think our task is for us to keep those lessons of love close to our heart so we can move forward to creating a more compassionate world.

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