Posts Tagged ‘San Francisco’

Dr. D., A Story of An Amazing College Professor

February 9, 2016

Greetings Readers,

Today is the 8th year anniversary of the death of my beloved college professor, Dr. John A. Dennis, affectionately known to his students as Dr. D.

Dr. D. to many was more than a college professor. He was not your average professor either. This man taught at Saint Mary’s College of CA, City College of San Francisco, and at the Edward Sands School in East Oakland. And on the weekends taught Prison Ministry. As you can see, Dr. D. was no ordinary man. He was an amazing human being with an extraordinary gift of educating countless beautiful souls.

I can go on and on but words won’t do Justice to what Dr. D. meant to me or to those who were fortunate to know him.  Dr. D, created a beautiful garden of LOVE. In his garden, he cultivated seeds in the hearts and minds of all his students. He planted sees of understanding, respect, compassion, laughter, friendship, spirituality, and knowledge. Each one of his students is a seed in Dr. D’s garden of LOVE. I think every one of his students carry seeds that have been cultivated in us and continue planting seeds of compassion, respect and dignity to the people that we come across whether it be a homeless person, youth, our elders or fellow peers. In doing so, we resurrect the spirit of Dr. D. but at the same time we give those who were not fortunate to meet him a glimpse of what a special person Dr. D was.

Now that one has an idea of who this amazing person was, it is my honor to inform you all that my dear friend and former student of Dr.D., will be doing a film about his life. I am attaching the link below for those who want to get further information and want to support this project. One huge favor I ask is to please spread the word. I think it is very important that this story get told and what better way than one of his former students.

Here is the link. Please check it out. There is also a video where you can see for yourself, “Dr. D. in action.” Please help my friend make Dr. D.’s Film a reality.  Thank you all in advance.

http://opificermedia.com/wordpress/

Paul Boden Discusses Homelessness in America

November 30, 2014

My dear friend, Paul Boden, a longtime homeless advocate and a leader in the homeless rights movement was a guest on the Tavis Smiley show to discuss homelessness in America. Tavis did a great job at letting its viewers know about Paul’s new book. If you want a copy of the book please go to http://www.wraphome.org.
Here is Paul’s piece at the Tavis Smiley show.

Please feel free to share this video to whomever you think will benefit from it.
http://video.pbs.org/viralplayer/2365376438

Street Soccer L.A. Brings Home The Street Soccer USA Cup Championship Trophy

August 18, 2014

Over this past weekend, Street Soccer USA held its national tournament in San Francisco at the Civic Center. Street Soccer is a tournament held once a year where several states are represented in teams made up of current or former homeless individuals. Their is a men’s tournament and a women’s tournament. This year Street Soccer Los Angeles took a men and women’s team to San Francisco and both teams won their championship game, making it the first time that Street Soccer L.A. are crowned the Street Soccer USA National Champions. Some members from the men and women’s teams will now have the opportunity to represent Team USA in the Homeless World Cup in Santiago, Chile later this year. Congratulations to both teams for their hard work and for making history.

Here is an article about the weekend’s street soccer tournament in San Francisco.
http://www.sfexaminer.com/sanfrancisco/soccer-program-gives-homeless-chance-to-succeed/Content?oid=2877732

For those who want to know how the USA Homeless World Cup team started, here is an article. The first team was back in 2003. The article shares stories on how people came to being homeless and the type of players that make up a team. Great read.
http://old.chronicle.augusta.com/stories/2003/07/05/biz_380313.shtml

Street Soccer LA started in 2008 just in time when Street Soccer USA held its 1st National tournament (formerly known as Homeless USA Cup) in DC. During our first year, Street Soccer L.A. went undefeated and lost the championship game to street soccer twin cities. Youth from Jovenes,Inc have represented Team USA in the Homeless World Cup in the past couple of years going to countries such as Melbourne,Australia, Paris,France, Rio de Janeiro,Brasil, and Mexico City.

For those who are interested in learning more about Street Soccer LA, click on the link below. You also find a very inspirational video about street soccer Los Angeles.
http://www.jovenesinc.org/index.php/our-solutions2/street-soccer-los-angeles
Please consider donating by clicking on the link below. Any amount makes a difference.
http://www.jovenesinc.org/index.php/ways-to-give

Happy 80th Birthday, Roberto Clemente!

August 18, 2014

Clemente21

Happy 80th Birthday to Roberto Clemente! As a baseball and Dodgers fan, Roberto Clemente is one of my all time heroes. This is what I wrote about Clemente last year, so will include it below in addition to couple videos on the pride of Puerto Rico. Enjoy!

Roberto was born in Carolina, Puerto Rico. At an early age, Roberto started playing baseball. In 1954, the Brooklyn Dodgers offered him a contract to play for their Triple-A team, the Montreal Royals. While with the Royals, Roberto didn’t play that much. He was often bench. Some say that the Dodgers were trying to guard him from the Rookie Draft of 1954. But, Clyde Sukeforth, a baseball scout for the Pittsburgh Pirates observed that Clemente was being bench and encouraged the Pirates to draft him. On November 22, 1954, the Pittsburgh Pirates selected Roberto Clemente in the Rookie Draft.

Roberto Clemente made his major league debut on April 17, 1955 against the Brooklyn Dodgers. He didn’t do well in his rookie season due to being involved in a car accident midway thru the season. Roberto Clemente really exploded with the Pirates in the 1960s. He led the Pirates to a World Series victory over the Yankees in 1960. Clemente led the National League in Batting in 1961, 1964, 1965 and 1967. He was the Most Valuable Player in 1966. He received numerous Gold Glove awards throughout the 60s for his outstanding defense. Clemente had a canon of an arm. He could throw a guy out at third base or home plate from right field. Players knew not to run on Clemente. He was one of the most amazing players to watch. He helped the Pirates win a second World Series in 1971 when the Pirates beat the heavily favored Baltimore Orioles in seven games. He was named World Series MVP after hitting .414 and hitting a solo home run in the Pirates 2-1 victory in game 7 of the World Series.

Roberto Clemente struggled with injuries and in 1972 he only played in 102 games but ended batting .312 in the season. Roberto collected his 3,000 hit, a double of the Mets’ Jon Matlack in front of the Pittsburgh Pirates fans at Three Rivers Stadium. That would end up being his last hit in the major leagues.

Roberto Clemente was not an ordinary baseball player. He used the diamond to expressed one of his many gifts. Clemente was a great soul. He cared for the most marginalized. He demonstrated tremendous compassion to the poor. Following the 1972 season, there was a catastrophic earthquake in Managua, Nicaragua. Upon realizing that some of the aid that he had previously sent to Nicaragua was not reaching those affected by the earthquake but intercepted by the Somoza government, Roberto Clemente boarded a small airplane that was taking aid packages to the victims. The plane left from Puerto Rico on December 31, 1972 but mechanical problems forced the plane to crash into the ocean off the coast of Isla Verde, Puerto Rico. Everyone from the Pirates attended Clemente’s memorial except his close friend and teammate, catcher, Manny Sanguillen, who decided to jump into the ocean in hopes of finding Roberto’s body. Roberto Clemente’s body was never found.

Roberto Clemente was inducted into Baseball’s Hall of Fame posthumously in 1973, becoming the first Latino to be elected into the Hall of Fame. Roberto was an amazing man. It takes a special man to go out of his way and coordinate emergency relief for victims of an earthquake in another country. Not only did Clemente orgazined relief funds but he put his family aside to personally go to Nicaragua and deliver the aid to the victims.

Major League Baseball (MLB) owes a lot to Roberto Clemente. I know that they have an award name after him for players who best follow Clemente’s humanitarian work but the award is not enough. It is time that Bud Selig, the commissioner of Baseball pays tribute to Clemente just the same way he did to Jackie Robinson. It is time for Clemente’s number 21 to be retired by all major league teams. Having his number 21 retired will send a powerful message that MLB truly honors and respects Clemente’s humanitarian work.

As a Jackie Robinson and Roberto Clemente fan, I think its only fair that 21 and 42 be the only numbers to be retired by all teams. Having 21 retired paves the way for MLB to have Roberto Clemente Days’ to be celebrated on August 18th as days where MLB will partner up with local community organizations and sponsor an organization that is doing amazing work on issues impacting that baseball’s town. In Los Angeles, it could be a grassroots organization working to end homelessness. In San Francisco, it could be an organization that advocates for equality when it comes to same sex marriages. In New York, it could be an organization that advocates for equal distribution of wealth and holds Wall Street thugs accountable to pay their share of taxes. In Pittsburgh, it could be an organization that brings awareness to the health conditions of the miners in Pennsylvania. If Major League Baseball had Roberto Clemente Days’ on August 18th, we will once again be demonstrating that Sports serves as a vehicle to address social issues that are not only impacting communities but putting the spotlight on community organizations who are making a difference in the lives of many Americans.

May we continue to keep Clemente’s legacy and spirit alive by living our lives for the greater good of others. Jackie Robinson once said, “A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives.” Roberto Clemente lived by that quote. More importantly, he lived by his own quote, “If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don’t do that, you are wasting your time on this Earth,”

Jackie Robinson Strong!

April 15, 2014

As most Americans were remembering the anniversary of the Boston Marathon  tragedy, I was remembering Jackie Robinson. Today is the 10th anniversary that Major League Baseball has celebrated Jackie Robinson Day.

It is a day where baseball fans get to see their favorite player wearing number 42. A day where baseball pays tribute to the man who broke the color barrier line but more importantly the man who revolutionize the game with his base running.

As a Jackie Robinson fan I must say that I was disappointed that the Dodgers were playing an away game at San Francisco on this day. It was my tradition to go to Dodger Stadium when the Dodgers played on Jackie Robinson Day. It doesnt make sense that the Dodgers would be playing away from their fans on such a special day.

May this day be a reminder of what Jackie Robinson stood for not just as a baseball player but as a human being. Let it be known that as the nation remembers Boston we paused and salute someone who stood up in the face of adversity on this day: Number 42. Mr. Robinson. Thank you Jackie!
JACKIE ROBINSON STRONG!!

MLB Needs To Retire Roberto Clemente’s Number

August 18, 2013

MLB Needs To Retire Roberto Clemente's Number

Today is Roberto Clemente’s birthday. He would have been 79 years old today. Roberto was born in Carolina, Puerto Rico. At an early age, Roberto started playing baseball. In 1954, the Brooklyn Dodgers offered him a contract to play for their Triple-A team, the Montreal Royals. While with the Royals, Roberto didn’t play that much. He was often bench. Some say that the Dodgers were trying to guard him from the Rookie Draft of 1954. But, Clyde Sukeforth, a baseball scout for the Pittsburgh Pirates observed that Clemente was being bench and encouraged the Pirates to draft him. On November 22, 1954, the Pittsburgh Pirates selected Roberto Clemente in the Rookie Draft.

Roberto Clemente made his major league debut on April 17, 1955 against the Brooklyn Dodgers. He didn’t do well in his rookie season due to being involved in a car accident midway thru the season. Roberto Clemente really exploded with the Pirates in the 1960s. He led the Pirates to a World Series victory over the Yankees in 1960. Clemente led the National League in Batting in 1961, 1964, 1965 and 1967. He was the Most Valuable Player in 1966. He received numerous Gold Glove awards throughout the 60s for his outstanding defense. Clemente had a canon of an arm. He could throw a guy out at third base or home plate from right field. Players knew not to run on Clemente. He was one of the most amazing players to watch. He helped the Pirates win a second World Series in 1971 when the Pirates beat the heavily favored Baltimore Orioles in seven games. He was named World Series MVP after hitting .414 and hitting a solo home run in the Pirates 2-1 victory in game 7 of the World Series.

Roberto Clemente struggled with injuries and in 1972 he only played in 102 games but ended batting .312 in the season. Roberto collected his 3,000 hit, a double of the Mets’ Jon Matlack in front of the Pittsburgh Pirates fans at Three Rivers Stadium. That would end up being his last hit in the major leagues.

Roberto Clemente was not an ordinary baseball player. He used the diamond to expressed one of his many gifts. Clemente was a great soul. He cared for the most marginalized. He demonstrated tremendous compassion to the poor. Following the 1972 season, there was a catastrophic earthquake in Managua, Nicaragua. Upon realizing that some of the aid that he had previously sent to Nicaragua was not reaching those affected by the earthquake but intercepted by the Somoza government, Roberto Clemente boarded a small airplane that was taking aid packages to the victims. The plane left from Puerto Rico on December 31, 1972 but mechanical problems forced the plane to crash into the ocean off the coast of Isla Verde, Puerto Rico. Everyone from the Pirates attended Clemente’s memorial except his close friend and teammate, catcher, Manny Sanguillen, who decided to jump into the ocean in hopes of finding Roberto’s body. Roberto Clemente’s body was never found.

Roberto Clemente was inducted into Baseball’s Hall of Fame posthumously in 1973, becoming the first Latino to be elected into the Hall of Fame. Roberto was an amazing man. It takes a special man to go out of his way and coordinate emergency relief for victims of an earthquake in another country. Not only did Clemente orgazined relief funds but he put his family aside to personally go to Nicaragua and deliver the aid to the victims.

Major League Baseball (MLB) owes a lot to Roberto Clemente. I know that they have an award name after him for players who best follow Clemente’s humanitarian work but the award is not enough. It is time that Bud Selig, the commissioner of Baseball pays tribute to Clemente just the same way he did to Jackie Robinson. It is time for Clemente’s number 21 to be retired by all major league teams. Having his number 21 retired will send a powerful message that MLB truly honors and respects Clemente’s humanitarian work.

As a Jackie Robinson and Roberto Clemente fan, I think its only fair that 21 and 42 be the only numbers to be retired by all teams. Having 21 retired paves the way for MLB to have Roberto Clemente Days’ to be celebrated on August 18th as days where MLB will partner up with local community organizations and sponsor an organization that is doing amazing work on issues impacting that baseball’s town. In Los Angeles, it could be a grassroots organization working to end homelessness. In San Francisco, it could be an organization that advocates for equality when it comes to same sex marriages. In New York, it could be an organization that advocates for equal distribution of wealth and holds Wall Street thugs accountable to pay their share of taxes. In Pittsburgh, it could be an organization that brings awareness to the health conditions of the miners in Pennsylvania. If Major League Baseball had Roberto Clemente Days’ on August 18th, we will once again be demonstrating that Sports serves as a vehicle to address social issues that are not only impacting communities but putting the spotlight on community organizations who are making a difference in the lives of many Americans.

May we continue to keep Clemente’s legacy and spirit alive by living our lives for the greater good of others. Jackie Robinson once said, “A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives.” Roberto Clemente lived by that quote. More importantly, he lived by his own quote, “If you have a chance to accomplish something that will make things better for people coming behind you, and you don’t do that, you are wasting your time on this Earth,”

Call Your Elected Officials To Pass AB 5: Homeless Bill of Rights

May 22, 2013

 

For those in California, please call your representatives and have them support AB5. We need this bill to pass so cities will stop criminalizing people for being homeless and respect the Homeless Bill of Rights.

The following information is taken from http://www.wraphome.org :

AB 5, The Homeless Bill of Rights is being held in suspense by the Assembly Appropriations Committee. We need Californians everywhere to make their voice heard!

Here are some steps you can take to support AB 5, The Homeless Bill of Rights:

#1 – In support of the California Hunger Action Day on Wednesday May 22nd, AB 5 supporters are being asked to contact members of the Appropriations Committee to reinforce the message that homelessness and the suffering associated with it, like hunger and incarceration, must end.

Every year advocates, soup kitchen volunteers, nutritionists, food bank supporters, and others concerned about the millions of Californians experiencing hunger travel by bus, car, and plane to participate in an important event, the annual California Hunger Action Day happening on Wednesday May 22nd. As a part of their legislative priorities, they will be lobbying for AB 5 as a critical step towards ending hunger. You can join them, too! Be sure to prioritize May 22nd for making your calls but keep the pressure on until May 24th.

Sample script: “Hello, my name is ____________ and I am a resident of _____. I am calling to urge the Assemblymember to vote in support of AB 5, the Homeless Bill of Rights, moving out of suspense.
I believe the savings from ending the criminalization of homelessness greatly outweigh any costs associated with AB 5.”

If you’re in the East Bay:
Speaker Perez: 916-319-2053, speaker.perez@assembly.ca.gov
Mike Gatto, Chair: 916-319-2043, Amin.nojan@asm.ca.gov
Bill Quirk: 916-319-2020, Amin.nojan@asm.ca.gov

If you’re in Los Angeles:
Speaker Perez: 916-319-2053, speaker.perez@assembly.ca.gov
Mike Gatto: 916-319-2043, amin.nojan@asm.ca.gov
Raul Bocanegra: 916-319-2039, israel.salas@asm.ca.gov
Steven Bradford: 916-319-2062, andrea.perry@asm.ca.gov
Ian C. Calderon: 916-319-2057, tom.White@asm.ca.gov
Jimmy Gomez: 916-319-2051, christina.romero@asm.ca.gov
Isadore Hall, III: 916-319-2064, Aaron.skaggs@asm.ca.gov
Chris R. Holden: 916-319-2041, darryl.Lucien@asm.ca.gov

If you’re in Sacramento:
Speaker Perez: 916-319-2053, speaker.perez@assembly.ca.gov
Mike Gatto: 916-319-2043, amin.nojan@asm.ca.gov
Susan Talamantes Eggman: 916-319-2013, erin.Flannery@asm.ca.gov
Richard Pan: 916-319-2009, darin.walsh@asm.ca.gov

If you’re in San Francisco:
Speaker Perez: 916-319-2053, speaker.perez@assembly.ca.gov
Mike Gatto: 916-319-2043, Amin.nojan@asm.ca.gov
Nora Campos: 916-319-2027, Larry.Sokol@asm.ca.gov
Shirley N. Weber: 916-319-2079, crystal.quezada@asm.ca.gov

#2 –We only have till May 24th to get off of suspense and to the full assembly before the end of this session..
so call every day!!!

Send your Support Letter
http://www.wraphome.org/ images/stories/ ab5documents/ AB5SupportLetter_Assembly_. pdf

to Appropriation Committee members
http://www.wraphome.org/ images/stories/ ab5documents/ FullAppropAssembly.pdf

Full Assembly roster
http://www.wraphome.org/ images/stories/ ab5documents/ Fullassemblylist.pdf

 

#3 – “Like” & “Share” AB 5 Daily Facts available on WRAP’s facebook. WRAP members need your support in countering the misinformation being shared about what AB 5 will and will not do. Help us by sharing an AB 5 Daily Fact posted everyday on WRAP’s facebook. The daily facts share the hard and simple facts about AB 5 and why California needs to pass this critical piece of legislation NOW and highlights our brilliant campaign artwork.

To post or see past AB 5 Daily Facts, visit our facebook by clicking here!

#4 – Sustain the AB 5 Campaign by making a donation to WRAP. WRAP member organizations are made up of the grassroots movement to end homelessness and the human suffering attached to it. Most of our work is volunteer-based and centers the voices and experiences of homeless and poor people. Your monetary and in-kind donations keep this work moving forward.

For more information on WRAP, AB 5, and to make a donation, please visit the WRAP website by clicking here.

 

Glenn Burke…PRESENTE!!!

May 31, 2011

It was the last game of the 1977 baseball season when the Dodgers’ Dusty Baker hit a homerun and Glenn Burke ran to the field to congratulate him by giving him a “high five.” It was that moment where people credit Glenn Burke for inventing the “high five” that is used in the major sports of America. It is reported that when Glenn Burke hit his first major league homerun in that same game, Dusty Baker congratulated Glenn Burke for hitting his first homerun in the Majors by high fiving him. From that moment on, the trend just carried on.

Glenn Burke was an amazing athlete. He was once referred by a Dodgers coach as the “next Willie Mays.” Glenn Burke had all the tools to be one of the greatest baseball players in Major League history but there was one obstacle. Glenn Burke was a gay baseball player. He was the first gay baseball player to play in the major leagues.

Glenn Burke was a pioneer for gay baseball athletes. The sad part is that no other player has had the courage to “come out” while being an active baseball player. Maybe its because they recognized that doing so will be “baseball suicide” as some people have stated is what happened to Glenn Burke. By becoming the first gay baseball player to play in the major leagues, Glenn had it rough. Al Campanis, the General Manage of the Los Angeles Dodgers at one point offered Glenn Burke to pay for an excessive honeymoon if Glenn agreed to get married. Glenn refused. Tommy Lasorda the manager of the Dodgers at the time was bothered by the fact that Glenn Burke was openly dating his son, Tommy Lasorda, Jr.  When Lasorda’s son passed away in 1991, Tommy issued a statement stating his son died of pneumonia and not of AIDS. Many people feel that it was Tommy Lasorda who pressured the front office to trade away Glenn Burke because he was dating his son.

Glenn’s Dodger teammates embraced him for who he was. Davey Lopes, the Dodgers current 1st base coach and the team captain of the 1977 season stated, “no one cared about his lifestyle.” While some players had no issues with Glenn’s lifestyle, it was the Dodgers management who felt uncomfortable having a gay athlete in their roster. Glenn Burke was eventually traded to the Oakland Athletics after the 1977 season, returning back to the bay area where he had excelled as a basketball player in high school. In Oakland, rather than feeling at home, he was harrassed by his own manager, Billy Martin. When introducing Glenn Burke to his new team in spring training, Billy Martin is quoted as saying, “and by the way…he’s a faggot!”

Glenn Burke ended playing two seasons with the Oakland A’s after suffering a knee injury that forced him to be demoted to the minor leagues and being release in 1979. His short major league career was cut short after 4 seasons and at the young age of 27.

Glenn Burke mentioned that “[In] 1978, I think everybody knew [and I’m] sure [my] teammates didn’t care.” He went on to say, “Prejudice drove me out of baseball sooner than I should have. But I wasn’t changing…Prejudice just won out.” One of Glenn Burke’s famous quotes goes on to say, “They can’t ever say now that a gay man can’t play in the majors, because I’m a gay man and I made it.”

Glenn Burke had a difficult life after baseball. He participated in the first Gay Games in 1982 winning medals in the 100 and 200 meter sprints. He ended becoming homeless in San Francisco and falling into drugs. He died on AIDS complications on May 30, 1995.

I believe the story of Glenn Burke exposes the homophobia culture that exist in major league sports. It showed how Tommy Lasorda and Billy Martin were two of the biggest homophobic managers in the game of baseball. Shame on Tommy Lasorda and Billy Martin. Glenn Burke is the Jackie Robinson of gay athletes. He enters the same realm as that of Harvey Milk. Glenn Burke was a man of integrity and courage. A great baseball player and a great human being. His story is one that I hope will inspire gay athletes to embrace who they are and play the game they love. As a sports fan, I long for the day when gay athletes can be comfortable for who they are and not have to think about ruining their careers simply by being themselves. I will stand by those gay athletes who realize that we are living in the 21st century and no longer must they continue to live their lives hiding their sexual preference.

I think the Dodgers owes a lot to Glenn Burke. Just the same way they retired Jackie Robinson’s number 42, they should retired his number 3. Glenn Burke didn’t accomplish a lot in baseball not because he couldn’t but because he was forced out of the game. His contributions of becoming the first gay baseball player and a great human being should be taken into consideration.

Here is a trailer on the documentary on the life of Glenn Burke.

Glenn Burke…PRESENTE!!!
AHORA…Y…SIEMPRE!!!

It’s Time for DODGERS BASEBALL!!!

March 31, 2011

Today begins my relationship with the Dodgers. Any fan will tell you that our devotion to our Sports Team is like a marriage. I’ve been married to the Dodgers over 30 years and I have always been there through the good times and bad times. I know that for the next 6 months, I am going to have my highs and lows. I am going to be happy one day and sad the next. There will be days where I will be filled with joy and others where I don’t want to talk about the game. There will be days where I can’t wait to get home and listen to Vin Scully give the play by play. There is something magical when listening to his voice.

As for this upcoming season, I am optimistic like always. Opening Day is like a honeymoon. Once the honeymoon ends, the tough work lies ahead. 2011 is the 30th anniversary of Fernandomania as well as the 30th anniversary since the Dodgers won their 1st World Series in the 80s, the 2nd coming back in 1988, which happens to be the last time the Dodgers have been in the fall classic.

I hope 2011 is the year that Dodgers make it to the World Series. I have been saying this for more than 20 years. It is just part of my Opening Day remarks. I have to let those words get out of my chest.

Like always, if the Dodgers stay healthy, I have big expectations. The moves that they made over the off season were alright. I think the pitching staff is decent. If the pitchers stay healthy, I expect blow out seasons for Clayton Kershaw, Chad Billingsley and great performances by the rest. The bullpen is going to be a big factor as the season goes along. If Jonathan Broxton shows any signs of meltdown, I say give the closer duties to K.J. or Kuo. The Dodgers should trade Broxton if he doesn’t perform at the level that he is capable.

This years team should be able a better defensive team than last year and more aggressive on the basepaths with the addition of Davey Lopes. I hope Matt Kemp and the rest have taken the techniques that Lopes has taught them and they implement those techniques in the games. Matt Kemp if he stays healthy should have at least a 30/30 season. Andre Either should be able to hit at least 25 home runs and drive in around 98 RBIs. James Loney has to be more aggressive at the plate and let his hands go. I hope he has a great season where he hits at least 20 homeruns with 110 RBIs and 42 doubles couple than with 18 stolen bases. If Juan Uribe has a little better season than last year, it will be great.

There is nothing better than starting the season facing ur hated rivals, the San Francisco Midgets. Clayton Kershaw vs Tim Lincecum should be a great pitchers’ duel. I can’t wait for today’s game and tuning in to Vin Scully. I am ready for what this season has to offer me. I hope more great memories than painful ones.

It’s time for DODGERS BASEBALL!!!

God’s Smile and Andrew Zimmern Teams Up with 100k Homes Campaign

March 1, 2011
Many people know Andrew Zimmern as the host of the Bizarre Foods, but at one point he was homeless. That is why on today’s segment of Bizarre Foods, he goes to San Francisco and shows the REAL San Pancho. It is in this segment where one will see him feed the homeless along with members of Food Not Bombs and other volunteers.

Today’s segment is also special because for every viewer that tunes in, a donation will be made to the 100,000 homes campaign, which aims to house 100,000 of the most chronically homeless by July, 2013.

Check out the interview below where Andrew talks about his homeless experience and about today’s program. One thing that he mentions in the interview that I have been telling people is that homeless people need to be treated with respect. In my interactions with homeless people and with anyone for that matter, I focus on R.A.D., which is Respect And Dignity. As long as we treat people with Respect and recognize their Dignity, we are moving forward to creating a more compassionate society. Here is the interview. Check it out.

Here is a short segment on today’s show. I hope people will be inspired and join our cause to end homelessness in the U.S. The best way to learn about homelessness is by having conversations with the people in the streets and listening to their stories.

Finally, here is a poem I wrote 10 years ago. Hope you enjoy it.

God’s Smile

You see them everywhere you go.
They are in your cities, towns, neighborhoods, and
you can’t seem to realize them.
     You walk by homeless people
     and you ignore them.
They get close to you and you’re already shaking.
Why is that?
     Is it because they are different than you?
     Is it because of the way they are dress?
You should look inside of them before you judge them.
You should take the time to chat with them, and
then based your judgments from your conversation.
     Have you ever wonder,
     how much you can learn from homeless people?
     Have you ever wonder,
     if at one point in their lives, they were better than you were?
People from all over come to live this lifestyle.
Some are well educated and with their degrees they prove it.
But you wouldn’t know this because
you are too busy seeing the outside.
     Let me take you to another plain of thought.
Have you ever wonder why homeless people
have so much faith in God?
Why they continue to have faith
despite the obstacles and the struggles

that they go through?
     Why some are full of joy and spirit,
     while most of us stress about the small things
     and their life is far worse than ours?
Something to think about.
     Think about this.
Have you ever seen God smile?
How many pictures have you seen
when He is smiling?
     As far as I’m concern, none.
     Now wouldn’t it be nice to see His smile?
     Wouldn’t it be nice to see if God has dimples?
You have been given the opportunity
to see His smile.
In fact, you see it every time homeless people smile at you,
but you have been blind to see it.
     Why do you think Mother Teresa
     dedicated her life to help the poorest of the poor?
Mother Teresa knew she was seeing
God’s smile when they would smile at her.
Next time you come across homeless people,
realize the smile that they carry.
It’s not any other ordinary smile.
It’s God’s smile.